C++ exception (3) – catching an exception

This is the third post of a series that I am making on C++ exceptions. C++ exception (1) — zero-cost exception handlingThis is the first post of a series I am making on C++ exceptions. C++ exception (1) — zero-cost exception handlingThis is the first post of a series I am making…

C++ exception (2) — throwing an exception

This is the second post of a series that I am making on C++ exceptions. C++ exception (1) — zero-cost exception handlingThis is the first post of a series I am making on C++ exceptions. C++ exception (1) — zero-cost exception handlingThis is the first post of a series I am making…

C++ exception (1) — zero-cost exception handling

This is the first post of a series I am making on C++ exceptions. C++ exception (1) — zero-cost exception handlingThis is the first post of a series I am making on C++ exceptions. C++ exception (2) — throwing an exceptionThis is the second post of a series that I am making…

`struct Foo f;` and `struct Foo f{};` are very different

Compare the following two programs, and can you predict what the outputs would be for each? // program #1 struct Foo { int x; }; void stack() { int x = 3; } void bar() { struct Foo foo{}; cout << foo.x << endl; } int main() { stack(); bar(); return 0; } // program #2 struct Foo…

When would someone use std::enable_shared_from_this

std::enable_shared_from_this allows a class to have a valid shared_ptr of this. Simply adding a member function that returns shared_ptr<T>(this) is susceptible to double-free. But when would you use such a feature? It's a relevant question because, next time when you…

Build `folly::coro` with GCC

You have heard about Coroutine in C++, and you want to use it. There're two coroutine implementations that are considered most mature - cppcoro and folly::coro. They are written by the same guy - Lewis Baker. He's brilliant, and you shoud watch his cppcon talk on structured concurrency if…

SeqLock

Sequential lock is a common technique used to protect data that's frequently read and rarely updated. Writers are required to take exclusive lock to mutate the data. Reads are effectively lock free and optimistic. The data protected by a SeqLock usually needs to be trivially_copy_constructible. // reader std::atomoc&…